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What is the process Waka Kotahi will be using during this time to consider funding for new improvement projects?

Waka Kotahi will continue to consider all applications for funding of activities through the National Land Transport Programme (NLTP) in the usual manner.  Investment decisions will be subject to the usual policies and processes. 

During this time, will Waka Kotahi continue to meet existing funding commitments in the 2018-21 NLTP?

Waka Kotahi will continue to fund all activity class programmes of work that are currently funded and underway. Approved Organisations (AOs) should continue to submit claims through the Transport Investment Online (TIO) tool in the usual manner.  

All claims will be subject to the rigour of existing policies and processes. However, we recognise that not all AOs will have the usual resources to hand. There may be delays in submitting claims and other reporting. While we accept this, it is beneficial that AOs claim promptly.

What impact will COVID-19 have on the Funding Assistance Rate (FAR)?

The policy around the Funding Assistance Rate (FAR) has not changed, with the exception of public transport services. Waka Kotahi and Ministry of Transport (MoT) have released policy guidance around additional public transport funding that will be made available to AOs during the COVID-19 crisis.  

Is Waka Kotahi likely to adjust the FAR at this time?

As per the existing policy, a range of criteria are required to be met to enable Waka Kotahi to enter into FAR adjustments if there is evidence of genuine difficulty in raising local or Waka Kotahi share in the short term - the reasons for the adjustment could include: 

  • significantly lower local or National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) revenue than forecast, requiring a pullback in AO or Waka Kotahi expenditure 
  • the relevant organisation is at the limit of its approved policy or ability to raise or draw down debt so cannot fund the activity within the desired time frame 
  • competing priorities also being delivered by the organisation restrict its ability to fund its share. 

At this stage we are uncertain as to the NLTF revenue, under a. above. 

What do we do if there are changes to scope, cost or cashflows?

Monitoring of progress and forecasting of claims should provide all organisations with a view of the need to apply for an adjustment of their projects/programmes through cost scope and cashflow adjustments. 

Organisations must inform their Waka Kotahi representative as soon as they are aware of the need for any cost scope or cashflow adjustment. This includes the release of any surplus funds that are not required to deliver the planned activity or activities. 

Is there any assistance to help with road safety promotion?

Many AOs have Road Safety Promotion (RSP) programmes and Waka Kotahi has staff available to help explore options and opportunities on how to manage these programmes during this time. Please contact Marceli Davison marceli.davison@nzta.govt.nz or Trish Rudolph trish.rudolph@nzta.govt.nz.

How do we extend CoPTTM trainees warrants during the COVID-19 lockdown?

If CoPTTM trainees are unable to attend refresher courses because of  COVID-19 travel restrictions, they do need to temporarily extend their warrant and should contact Kim Laurenson directly with their warrant details - Kim.laurenson@nzta.govt.nz

What transport projects will be part of the Government’s economic stimulus package?

The Government has tasked a group of industry leaders to identify infrastructure projects that are ready to start construction in the immediate and medium term to help create employment and rebuild the economy to lessen the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. This work is being led by an Infrastructure Industry Reference Group, headed by Crown Infrastructure Partners chairman Mark Binns.

Waka Kothi is working with our partners in central government to understand what projects and programmes may be suitable to best deliver the Government’s priorities of a safe, multi-modal, low-carbon land transport system that will position New Zealand strongly for the future. Projects will also be considered against how they support Government objectives of improving productivity, unlocking housing opportunities, supporting regions, creating an urban and freight mode shift, and building safer and more resilient communities.

How can AOs offer a scheme like the Advanced Entitlement Package (AEP) rolled out by Waka Kotahi? 

Waka Kotahi has made all its documents available to allow AOs to customise these for their own use.

Documents and more information about the AEP scheme

What is considered essential services in relation to local road maintenance?

Waka Kotahi has shared its State Highway Response Plan with local government and our regional System Management team are contacting their AO counterparts to set up meetings to discuss the response plan, our definition of essential services and whether this is appropriate for AO adoption.

Is there approved messaging to encourage people to not travel and stay at home?

Waka Kotahi has worked with Civil Defence and Emergency Management to develop an approved list of VMS messages. This is a live list, with applications for any new messaging to be made by emailing NERT@nzta.govt.nz or by contacting your regional CDEM liaison person.

We encourage councils to use these same approved messages, which are:

Messages appropriate for Level 2

No. Message  Approved for
Level 4  Level 3 Level 2  Level 1 
BE KIND, STAY CALM 
COVID19.GOVT.NZ 
WAIKATO 
WELFARE HELP 
0800 800 405 
BAY OF PLENTY 
WELFARE HELP 
0800 884 222 
CAUTION 
WILDLIFE ON ROAD 

Note: MVMS preferred for this message, to leave Static VMS for National Messages where possible 
CHECKPOINT AHEAD 
COVID19.GOVT.NZ 

Note: MVMS preferred for this message, to leave Static VMS for National Messages where possible 

BE MINDFUL OF 
CYCLISTS/WALKERS 
ON ALL ROADS   

Note: ensure this message is used in appropriate location only, where active modes are expected.  

PLAY IT SAFE. STAY CALM. BE KIND 
PLAY IT SAFE. EXPECT DELAYS. PLAN AHEAD 
PLAY IT SAFE, SLOW DOWN 
10  ALERT LEVEL 2 STARTS TODAY 

Other messages

No. Message  Approved for
Level 4  Level 3 Level 2  Level 1 
STAY HOME, SAVE LIVES 
COVID19.GOVT.NZ 
ESSENTIAL TRAVEL 
ONLY 
COVID19.GOVT.NZ 
ESSENTIAL WORKERS 
WE THANK YOU 
FREIGHT MOVERS 
WE THANK YOU 
5 Two-line VMS
 
Page 1 
ESSENTIAL WORKS 
AHEAD 

Page 2 
ESSENTIAL WORKS 
SLOW DOWN 
Three-line VMS 

ESSENTIAL WORKS 
AHEAD 
SLOW DOWN 
Two-line VMS

Page 1 
WE ARE STILL 
AT LEVEL 4 

Page 2 
STAY HOME, SAVE LIVES 
COVID19.GOVT.NZ 
8 LEVEL 3: LOCAL  
TRAVEL ONLY    
COVID19.GOVT.NZ 
KIA KAHA NZ 
STAY HOME 
BE KIND 
10  STILL AT ALERT LEVEL 3. KIA KAHA 
11  PLAN FOR SHIFT TO ALERT LEVEL 2  
14 MAY 

How can we minimise the impact on customers of restarting planned works on our roading network?

We ask that your teams work closely with their local Waka Kotahi Journey Manager and share knowledge of planned works through the local Network Activity Planning process. This will enable us to jointly manage planned works and the impacts on our customers.

Can emergency speed limits be set in response to Covid-19?

An epidemic is considered an ‘emergency’ in the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits, so Road Controlling Authorities (RCAs) can install ‘emergency’ speed limits during the COVID-19 response to improve safety.

The process to follow to implement an emergency lower speed limit is outlined further below. Essentially the process requires putting up an appropriate sign, notifying in the Gazette and notifying the Agency and the Police Commissioner in writing. The emergency speed limits can only apply while the emergency conditions exist. If the RCA decides it would like to retain the slower speed restriction after the emergency period is lifted, then it should progress a bylaw change to make it permanent, including meeting the consultation requirements for permanent speed limits under the Rule.

The lowering of speed limits can be done at any time during the COVID-19 emergency. Additional physical interventions may also be appropriate to help slow vehicle operating speeds and support social distancing, such as footpath widening or temporary cycle lanes.  In such cases, AOs may wish to consider access to Innovating Streets for People funding .

More information on the Innovating Streets funding 

Process for setting emergency speed limits:

The Rule only allows for temporary speed limits for road works, unsafe surfaces or special events. However, to support physical distancing associated with COVID-19 alerts, changes to speed limits can be made temporarily as ‘emergency’ speed limits, without a bylaw change, by notifying them in the Gazette. Emergency speed limits apply while the emergency conditions exist (for a maximum of 12 months), so you would still have to go through your bylaw change process to make them permanent or else they will revert back to what they are now after the emergency conditions finish (or after 12 months).

If you are considering setting an emergency speed limit, then ensure you read Section 7 of the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 and comply with it. An epidemic is included in the definition of an emergency under section 7.1 (1) of the Rule. The new speed limit applies when a sign is put up that complies with Section 9 (Signs and road markings) and the road controlling authority must as soon as practicable after setting or varying an emergency speed limit, notify the Agency and the Commissioner in writing about the speed limit, where it applies and the date it was set or varied. Within ten working days it must also publish a notice in the Gazette that provides details of the emergency speed limit, where it applies, the date it was set and the reasons for considering that an emergency speed limit is necessary.

Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017

Guidance on setting emergency speed limits [PDF, 172 KB]

What is the guidance for closures of streets to support safe physical activity?

An increased demand for walking and cycling during COVID-19 has resulted in insufficient space on many of our streets, particularly given physical distancing requirements. In areas with low traffic volumes, or low vehicle access requirements, temporary road closures can assist.

The Local Government Act 1974 sets out several council powers that are relevant to closing roads during COVID-19. Clause 11 of Schedule 10 of the LGA Act states that after consultation with the Police and the NZ Transport Agency, councils may close a road, or part of a road to all traffic or any specified type of traffic:

  • (b) where, in order to resolve problems associated with traffic operations on a road network, experimental diversions of traffic are required; or
  • (d) when for any reason it is considered desirable that traffic should be temporarily diverted to other roads;

These powers may be exercised by the chairman on behalf of the council or by any officer of the council authorised by the council in that behalf. Check your delegations to see who is authorised to make these decisions.

The Civil Defence Management Act 2002 is in place during a state of emergency. The state of emergency is reviewed every 7 days.

Under Section 88 of this Act, a constable, the controller of the state of emergency or someone acting under their authority, or someone authorised in the relevant civil defence emergency management plan, may, in order to prevent or limit the extent of the emergency totally or partially prohibit or restrict public access to any road or public place.

During the state of emergency, in areas where a road or street closure is required to support physical distancing and limit the extent of the emergency, this power may also be enacted by a Local or Group Controller.

Useful resources

Site start-up plan checklist [DOCX, 58 KB]

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