Skip to content

SCAM ALERT: Vehicle licence (rego) renewal emails phishing activity. If you're concerned, click here for information.

Access keys for nzta.govt.nz

  • h Home
  • m Menu
  • 0 Show list of access keys
  • 2 Skip to content
  • 3 Skip to top

SH5 Tarukenga to Ngongotaha

Section menu

Project introduction

This project will improve road and roadside safety on State Highway 5 between Tarukenga and Ngongotaha. Improved safety features may include roadside and median barriers, rumble strips and better signage.

  • Estimated project cost

    $10.7 million
  • Project type

    Safety improvements
  • Project status

    Design

Project updates

Making Rotorua's rural roads safer
Newsletters, (PDF)
SH5 Tarukenga to Ngongotaha feedback form
Project updates, (PDF)

Making the road safer

State Highway 5 between Tarukenga and Ngongotaha has been identified as one of the roads in the State Highway network which can be made safer.

Between 2006 and 2015, four people lost their lives and 10 people were seriously injured in crashes on this stretch of road. Loss of control has been a considerable factor in many of these crashes. The majority of death and serious injuries resulted from head-on collisions or cars running off the road and hitting roadside hazards such as trees, power poles or ditches. This means that if drivers do run off the road, there is a high likelihood of serious injury or death.

Our immediate priority is to make this a safer stretch of road as soon as possible, so that everyone can enjoy safer journeys.

What we are doing

People will always make mistakes, but there are changes we can make to the road so simple mistakes don’t cost lives. Road and roadside safety improvements are proposed for this 8km section of State Highway 5 from Tarukenga to the outskirts of Rotorua near Ngongotaha.

Potential safety improvements include:

  • Roadside and median safety barriers at high risk locations to help reduce the risk of head-on collisions and prevent drivers from running off the road and hitting something much less forgiving – like a tree or power pole.
  • Rumble strips on centrelines and edge lines to give fatigued or distracted drivers a wake-up call if they stray across the line.
  • Signs and road markings to warn drivers of risks they need to prepare for further down the road such as intersections, stop signs or sharp curves.

Safety treatments will be confirmed following completion of the investigation phase. 

Top