Skip to content

Traffic and travel updates: visit the Journey Planner website(external link) for more information about the latest road closures affecting the South Island following the recent weather events.

Access keys for nzta.govt.nz

  • h Home
  • m Menu
  • 0 Show list of access keys
  • 2 Skip to content
  • 3 Skip to top

Most Innovating Streets projects will use features such as delineators, some form of markings and coloured surfacing.

Introducing new traffic signals and signs is less likely. It is important to beware of how these devices relate to the Traffic Control Device Rule and how the Rule describes them and their use. In this section we list some materials to consider, if you have had success with other materials we’d like to hear about them.

Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004

Delineators

In the Traffic Control Device Rule a delineator means ‘a traffic control device including a guide post, chevron board, bollard, barrel or barrier, that is placed on or beside a roadway to guide road users’. This includes planters, barriers, cones and other objects used to channel traffic. Whilst there are some general principles established in the Rule about where and how delineators are used (section 7.10 of the Rule) there is no detailed specifications for most types of delineator. These are an important ingredient in creating more space for people and ensuring cars keep out of that space. Below we list some possible materials to consider.

Traffic cone graphic

Product: Traffic cones
Cost: $$
Use: Pop-up

Traffic cones and barriers graphic

Product: Cones and barriers
Cost: $$
Use: Pop-up

Safehit flexipost graphic

Product: Safehit-flexipost
Cost: $$
Use: Pilot, semi-permanent

Hay bale graphic

Product: Haybale
Cost: $
Use: Pop-up

Straw wattle graphic

Product: Straw wattle
Cost: $
Use: Pop-up

Upcycled furniture graphic

Product: Upcycled furniture
Cost: $$ ($ if volunteer-made)
Use: Pop-up, Pilot

Placekit (moulded plastic funiture) graphic

Product: PlaceKit (moulded plastic furniture) that can also be used as planters
Cost: $$
Use: Semi-permanent

Markings

Markings for use on roads in New Zealand must comply with the Traffic Control Device Rule. A marking means ‘a line, symbol, pattern, message, numeral, pavement marker or other device set in the roadway or applied or attached to the road surface’.

This applies to whether the marking is in the roadway or on the footway. The reason for the prescription for markings is that often they serve a regulatory or warning purpose in which consistency is important.

Whilst coloured and textured surfacing types are referred to in the Rule, they may be used in a variety of situations (for example cycle lanes, bus lanes etc). Additionally, these features may offer a contrasting road surface colour when and where this might be useful.

Consequently, the use of coloured and textured surfacing types falls into the realm of ‘best practice’. One thing to note though is that the Rule does establish prescribed uses for three colours and as a result these colours should be avoided when considering surface colour or texture treatment. These are white, yellow and blue. For example, white limit lines are used at stop and give way intersections, yellow for no passing or no stopping lines and blue at mobility parking spaces.

Green is often associated with special vehicle lane and cycle / shared paths whilst red is used at higher risk-sites and some speed limit changes. It is worth recognising the uses for these colours when looking at colouring surfaces.

Giant street chalk graphic

Product: Giant street chalk
Cost: $
Use: Pop-up

Spray chalk graphic

Product: Spray chalk
Cost: $
Use: Pop-up

Line marking tape graphic

Product: Line marking tape
Cost: $$
Use: Pop-up

Plastic street coating graphic

Product: Thermoplastic street coating
Cost: $$$
Use:

Street print graphic

Product: Street print (pressed and coloured Asphalt)
Cost: $$$
Use: 

Astroturf graphic

Product: Astroturf
Cost: $$
Use: Pop-up, Pilot

Stencil graphic

Product: Stencil
Cost: $
Use: Pop-up, Pilot, Semi-permanent

Duratherm graphic

Product: ‘Duratherm’ inlaid thermopastic
Cost: $$$
Use: Semi-permanent, Permanent

Signs and traffic signals

Signs and traffic signals have an obvious traffic control purpose and consequently must comply with the Traffic Control Device Rule. Perhaps more so than markings, signs and traffic signals are a fundamental means of enforcing traffic law and warning road users of hazards. Many signs and traffic signals have significant history in internationally recognised standards and best practice. There are however some great opportunities to reflect local placemaking or implement wayfinding as part of a tactical project.

Stickers graphic

Product: Stickers
Cost: $
Use: Pop-up

Speed calming

Reducing traffic speeds to a survivable speed, below 30km/hr, will be a common aim for an Innovating Street project. At lower speeds community life can flourish, children have the opportunity to play in their street, traffic noise will be lower and it will be far more pleasant sitting at seats or in the space you create. Traffic calming features will therefore be an important consideration.

Rubber speed hump graphic

Product: Interlocking rubber speed hump (various height depending on target speed)
Cost: $$
Use: Pilot, Semi-permanent

Portable speed hump graphic

Product: Portable speed hump
Cost: $$
Use: Pop-up

Bollard graphic

Product: Bollard
Cost: $$
Use: Pop-up, Pilot, Semi-permanent

Planter graphic

Product: Planter
Cost: $$
Use: Pop-up, Semi-permanent

Top